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2.11.17

Travelling in England: Bath


Travelling in England: Bath

Hello folks!

As you may already know, I have a special passion for history and archeology. I followed an ancient history module at university, brilliantly ministered by the archeologist Pedro Paulo Funari, whilst I was studying Political Science. I've also lived in Egypt for two months, where I explored the most fascinating ancient tombs, temples and, of course, the pyramids. Meaning, I could not visit England without seeing one of the finest historical sites in the country - the Roman Baths

The city of Bath itself is one of those must-see-places for England lovers, it has beautiful sights to visit, as the Abbey Church of Saint Peter and Paul, sophisticated shop lanes and the lovely Pulteney Bridge, from where you can see the crossing of the river Avon. However, the most important attraction is definitely the Roman Baths. Believe me, they are breathtakingly beautiful.

According to archeological researchers, before the Roman invasion, the site was already treated as a shrine by the Celtics, thanks to its natural hot springs. Later, the bath complex as we know it was developed by the Romans starting around 70 AD. It took over 300 years to reach its final size. The site is not just composed of the terrace, seen from outside, but of several buildings which are now underground, as the ruins of Minerva's temple, saunas, changing rooms and plunge swimming pools. The Baths still flow with spring water, more precisely 1.170.000 liters per day,  reaching comfy 46°C .

Walking through the Roman Bath was definitely one of the best experiences I've ever had. I will never forget the colour of the water flowing inside the chambers, the soft steam on my skin, the texture of the huge stones and the autumn breeze blowing across the terrace. It feels like the Romans somehow are still there, guiding and inviting us to their exotic universe. One of the reasons why my experience was so positive, is due to the smart design of the tour created by the museum responsibles, which are not offering just a visit, but a unique learning experience. It's a brilliant example of how a historical sites should be: accessible and interactive for everybody.

After visiting the Roman Baths we've continued our path exploring the 18th-century neoclassical buildings of the centre. It's interesting to observe that such different architectonic styles can work very well together to build a astonishing scenario, like a flute and a percussion in an orchestra. Moreover, the contemporary and funky spice is also very present, one of my favorites were the flowers growing inside the traditional red British telephone boxes in several places of the city. That said, we can definitely categorize Bath as a very eccentric town.

Although Bath is a relatively crowded city, we found a very cool independent coffee place called Cafe au lait. For me, it's very important to celebrate and encourage local businesses. I sat on their comfy bay window and we ordered hot chocolate with carrot cake. There was no better way to chill before leaving! I'm already missing Bath and I wish I could stay longer...








Travelling in England: Bath

Travelling in England: Bath

Travelling in England: Bath

Travelling in England: Bath

Travelling in England: Bath

Travelling in England: Bath

Travelling in England: Bath


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